Archive | Organizational Development RSS feed for this section

Is the Service Model Dead?

We have all heard those dreadful terms – information waitress, ancillary staff, auxiliary staff, support staff – used to describe librarians in their service roles. It became evident thirty years ago from much evidence that the service model should be dead in schools. Support and assistance were helpful only insofar as they enabled equal partnerships. […]

Continue Reading

Do We Need Library Boards?

There are many reasons for library boards, not the least is perceived protection from City Hall. So few trustees appear to be appointed, however, for their strategic abilities, business acumen and political astuteness. Many CEOs complain that they want strong boards but then strong boards challenge and provoke, not high on anyone’s list. At least […]

Continue Reading

Time to Get Real about Advocacy

If you are wondering about the research on effective libraries (and librarians) as well as the perceptions of administrators and how to deal with their realities, you need go no further than the new MOOC (Massive On-line Open Course), hosted and taught by Wendy Newman of the University of Toronto. You can register for the […]

Continue Reading

Why Do Librarians Avoid Management?

Ask any beginning class of LIS students how many want to be managers and leaders in the field and you will be delighted if four or five respond affirmatively. This is largely a lack of interest coupled with a notion of managers being inherently evil. Alternately, and in my view even worse, some do not […]

Continue Reading

What Are Your Scenarios Depicting Different Futures for Libraries?

Guest blog by Joseph R. Matthews and Peter Hernon Joe Matthews is library consultant with JRM Consulting Inc. <http://www.joematthews.org/> Peter Hernon is professor emeritus at the Simmons Graduate School of Library and Information Science. Increasingly there are discussions about the relevance of libraries to their communities, parent institution and organization. Planning focuses on that relevance, […]

Continue Reading

Changing Key Language in a Collective Agreement

Outdated collective agreement language that inhibits change was raised as a major problem by a number of administrators at the Future of Libraries symposium recently held in Vancouver.   Several participants, however, mentioned that their library systems had managed to negotiate changes to major changes to their collective agreements.  The following is a case study […]

Continue Reading

Billions and Billions Served

Guest blog by Daphne Wood, director of planning and organizational development for the Vancouver Public Library. The latest entry into mass-market publishing is serving up more than books…and offering more food for thought. According to the October 9, 2013 edition of Advertising Age, McDonald’s was poised to become the top North American book publisher for […]

Continue Reading

Content in the Digital World

Guest blog by Scott Hargrove, director of IT and support services for the Fraser Valley Regional Library, and a presenter on digital competition at the Future of Libraries Institute. In a previous blog posting (2013 11 25), I noted the incredible growth of non-traditional competition that libraries are facing in the digital era. At the […]

Continue Reading

When libraries face budget challenges, why are branch closures off-the-table?

Guest blog by Ken Roberts of Ken Roberts Library Consulting. Ken was a presenter at the recent Future of Libraries Institute. Libraries spend most of their money on four things – staff, buildings, collections and technology.  Chairs become wobbly if their four legs are not balanced and public libraries become wobbly when their priorities are […]

Continue Reading

Move Forward or Sink?

Guest blogger Scott Hargrove, Director of IT and Support Services at the Fraser Valley (BC) Regional Library reflects on the future of the institution and of the profession. Do we move forward or sink? Thirty years ago, libraries were the dominant player in the information industry, with limited competition including the media, professional analytical firms […]

Continue Reading